Back in the Saddle

 

 

 

This site is often looked at as a source for violet ray information; those antiques of yore that gave birth to our beloved violet wand.  But it too, has too many statements based on opinion or speculation rather than fact.  Much of the site owner’s information is sound, agreed, when it is he himself who has done the research and science.  But for those things he has not researched himself, then he, like the millions of Michael Jackson posters, resorts to speculation.  Observe while I pull a rabbit out of the hat:

 

The site maintains that argon was not used to obtain the color purple in violet ray tubes, but mere removal of atmospheric pressure produces the purple, then blue, then white as you evacutate to higher negative pressure.  This of course, was in reference to a past day and age that no one living is in contact with.   It sounds a reasonable statement, from a largely reputable source for violet ray information.  However, what actually occurred, or occurs in practice?   I asked the only person I know who actually DOES manufacturer glass tube electrodes today, how they get the purple and the blue in their electrodes and some other questions about them.  Here are the excerpts of our phone conversation.

 

 

EmffanHow do you get the purple glow in your electrodes?

 

Violetwanda:  That’s argon.  Argon is a noble gas that glows purple when excited by electricity.

 

EmffanDo you have to use argon?  I’ve seen it said that you don’t have to use any gas to get it to glow purple, just an evacuation of the atmosphere inside it.

 

Violetwanda:  No, we have to use argon. It took us years of trial and error to make our own electrodes.  It was a lost art.  But never in that trial and error were we ever able to get a purple glow from just pumping it (the air) out, no. 

 

Emffan:    Why do you think someone would say that it doesn’t actually need argon?

 

Violetwanda:  I have no idea.  It hasn’t been our experience.  I mean, look at this:  Most regular lightbulbs are filled with argon.  That’s why THEY make purple streamers when used as a violet wand electrode.  But they don’t glow the way vw electrodes do.  Maybe they (the persons who say it) speculate on the fact that most of the air we breathe is made up of argon anyway.   But you can not just enclose a glass tube with available atmosphere, zap it with electricity, and expect it to glow.  It won’t glow.  You have to pump the air out to get enough negative pressure.  And when you’re pumping the air out of a glass tube, you pump out the argon too.  So its gone.  You have to put some back to get the glow and sufficient spark. 

 

Emffan:   Why is that about the spark


Violetwanda:  Neon signs do not spark when you touch them, right?  Part of an electrode’s spark is the voltage that you supply, but part of it is what’s happening inside the electrode.  You have to use the right amount of gas, and the right amount of negative pressure to get a spark X in length coming out , using Y voltage with the resistance of our glass.  Its a precise science as well as an art.

 

EmffanThat’s above my head, Im sorry to say, but I think I got it.  You have to put the argon back in, to get the right spark to come out, in other words. 

 

Violetwanda:  Right.

 

Emffan:  Ok, how do you get the pink?

 

Violetwanda:  A mix of argon and neon.  Its like a cooking recipe; one cup of this, one teaspoon of that.

 

Emffan: What about blue? 

 

Violetwanda:   Blue we achieve from argon at a higher back-pressure, plus minute amounts of other gases. 

 

Emffan Whats the other gas?

 

Violetwanda:  A pepsi-cola secret, hon, sorry. I can tell you its not mercury.

 

EmffanWhat about the red glow?  How do you get that?

 

Violetwanda:  Neon.  The days we do neon, unpredictable things can happen though.  If the outside atmospheric pressure is fighting us, we’ll get more peach out of our neon.  Neon sign makers have to use an inner coating to get a true red in their signs when they use neon, since its naturally a red-orange.

 

Emffan:  That’s interesting.  Could you use a coating too?  Or to get other colors?

 

Violetwanda:   Yes, but that would add significantly to the price, too much to warrant small-scale production.  Consumer testing doesn’t warrant it.  We’re even going to discontinue our pink and blue.

 

Emffan?  Why would you do that? 

 

Violetwanda:  A few reasons.  Mostly lack of interest, plus the difficulty and expense in producing blue.  Another is, many people believe there are only two (snipped) electrode colors anyway.

 

EmffanWhat do you mean they believe there are only two electrode colors?

 

Violetwanda:   (laughs).  I mean they get told by incorrect websites and demonstrators that there are ONLY two electrode colors, purple and ‘reactive’ red.  And they believe what they are told.  I don’t know why they don’t ask us as the source…I can do any color of glow and any color of glass.  I’ve been selling 4 colors for years.  And people still believe, because they are told, that there are only two electrode colors.  I don’t know what they think when they get to (my site) and see the options, beats me.  We even have made two-color electrodes.

 

Emffan: TWO colors?  In the same electrode?  How do you do that?

 

Violetwanda:  Another pepsi secret, but in essence, the glass glowed an electric blue on the outside, and the gas inside glowed red.  So you had the two colors glowing.  And the glows didn’t overlap each other.  It was the most stunning electrode we’ve ever done.  It was like, my moment when I knew, not only had we rediscovered all the old secrets of making electrodes, but that we’d improved upon them in so many ways.  We gave some to friends and members of the International Violet Wand Guild.  And I kept one.  That’s (sic) the only ones that will ever exist.


Emffan That sounds awesome.  Why won’t you make more? 

 

Violetwanda:  Same reasons. Because they’d be too expensive for people.   And because the ‘experts’ out there who want to sound like they know something, tell people they don’t exist.

 

End

 

As the never-growing-old denizen of Neverland would say:  “I DO believe in electrodes.  I do, I do!”  (clap your hands with me, people).

 

Two Tone Violet Wand Electrode

Photo was provided by interviewee at my repeated requests.  Well, I’m reasonably sure its not Michael Jackson’s penis, rumored also to be two colors, so it must be a violetwand electrode.  Fabulous, but now I’m going to lay awake nights wishing I had one, fretting over the knowledge that my violet wand kit will always be absent such a creation.  Can you imagine how frightfully wide a bottom’s eyes would get if they saw this coming?  Especially if they believed in rumors that things like this didn’t exist?  I doubt they’d be able to take their eyes off it.  I know I wouldn’t.

 

More:  You can read Wiki’s description of the process used to evacuate and backfill glass tubes to get them to glow, and what gases are commonly used, in this article.   

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2 Comments

  1. Donna May 7, 2016 at 4:09 pm

    Hello, I tried calling you several times today, and I’m not getting through for some reason, couldn’t even leave a voicemail. Give me a call plzzz.

     
  2. Emilie DeLasse May 2, 2016 at 4:55 pm

    This article is way out of date. You can get that electrode here. Its from mjolnir violet wands